8 Great Reclaimed & Sustainable Wood Options for Under $8 per sq ft

021CBCA8-C9B7-4249-ACFE-FAA6DF01CD71

A short time ago we asked for your feedback on our products–many thanks to all who responded! We want you to know we’ve heard you and we’re incorporating your feedback into our pricing, product collections, and R&D. A few highlights: all of you continue to feature wood in projects – from reclaimed, salvaged, vintage woods to sustainably harvested fresh wood products. Yes, us too. Then you told us that our new finishes and patterns continue to strike a cord. Cool, because we’ve spent the entire year coming up with new colors, patterns, and textures. Some of you said price can be a big player in whether or not you can design with wood while others said you thought all reclaimed wood was expensive. Perfect timing, we’d like to bring your attention to 8 of our species/grades that are under $8 per sq ft:

Continue reading

Sparkling Sawdust—HiLo Hotel in Portland

InviteBlog post by Deborah Roe

Thursday night (7/13) was the opening for HiLo in downtown Portland, Oregon. A few of us from Pioneer Millworks attended the event where we ate, were painted gold, and silently discoed the night away. The 120-room boutique style hotel resides in the Oregon Pioneer Building (a National Register of Historic Places). We have a few ties—turns out back in 2008-10 our own Elise Payne worked in the building.

Drinks

The party started as soon as we walked in the door. There were specialty drinks and intricate food of various varieties scattered throughout the hotel.

Continue reading

Meet the Team Featuring Tim

A native of California, Tim joined our team of Reclaimed Wood Design Experts servicing our current, and new, CA and NV customers. An avid gardener with a penchant for cookies, our interest was piqued and we put Tim through a range of questions. If you’d like to chat with him about any of our products you can shoot him an email or call him at (415) 961-2854.

tim dino web

Where are you from?
I was born in Southern California when there were still open spaces and orange trees in Orange County. I’m excited to serve my home state, to bring reclaimed and sustainable wood to projects there.

What’s your background with wood?
I have worked for several companies that crafted products out of wood. One company made custom wood garage doors with clear grade Douglas fir frames and Western Cedar fronts. Most recently I worked for a company that made custom playground equipment from free-of-heart Douglas fir post and beams. I love working with and selling wood products but always had mixed feelings about having to cut down trees. This one of the reasons I am so excited to be a part of Pioneer Millworks.

tim of pioneer millworks california nevada
What is your role on our team?
California and Nevada Reclaimed Wood Design Expert. I’m looking forward to getting to know Nevada better and having the opportunity to spend more time with my brother who lives in Minden.

Road trip selfie from Tim.

Road trip selfie from Tim.


What are you most looking forward to with your job?

Helping to create very personal, custom spaces with reclaimed wood that celebrates inspires, teaches, and heals the human experience. 

What about wood or reclaimed wood appeals to you?
How it is better for the planetless material going into landfills, and less demand to remove live trees. 

Tim with reclaimed wood kept from landfills!

Tim with reclaimed wood kept from landfills!


Which product is your favorite? Why?

Reclaimed timbersbecause each one is unique and has its own story.

Reclaimed timbers, agricultural of industrial salvage are Tim's favorite.

Reclaimed timbers, agricultural or industrial salvage are Tim’s favorite.


What are your hobbies outside of work?
My goal is to visit every National Park before I die, so…whitewater rafting, biking, hiking, and backpacking. I also like to garden and grow my own food. My dream is to own a small organic urban farm where I can supply organic food to local artisans and the community – as well as my family.

What’s your favorite book?
The Soul of a Tree: A Master Woodworkers Reflections, by George Nakashima

The soul of a tree book cover
Share something quirky about yourself…

I commute by bike most days and eat at least one cookie a day.

What is your favorite quote?
“A tree is our most intimate contact with nature.” 

And

In a world where manual skills are shunned, we believe in them, not only in the act of producing a better product but in the sheer joy of doing or becoming. We feel that pride in craftsmanship, of doing as perfect a job as possible, of producing something of beauty even out of nature’s discards, are all homely attributes that can be reconsidered.” Both by George Nakashima.

If you’d like to chat with Tim about any of our products you can shoot him an email or call him at (415) 961-2854.

Saving the Hilton Barn

 

FullSizeRender (14)There tend to be four reasons why barns are torn down.

  1. They are damaged or have not been properly maintained, leaving them structurally unsound.
  2. The owner is no longer able or willing to pay the upkeep costs (repair, taxes, insurance, etc.).
  3. To make way for future land development.
  4. The owner is looking to “cash in” on an asset.

We do our best to discourage those who fall into the last category. Pioneer Millworks was born eons ago as an offshoot of our sister company New Energy Works Timberframers (a leader in the timber frame industry). Working in close proximity with these talented craftsmen, engineers, and architects for all these years has given us a unique appreciation for timber frame construction and its historical roots in the architecture of American barns.

timber_frame_barn_winter

New Energy Works built barn.

timber_barn_interior

Interior of New Energy Works barn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While salvaging barn wood is integral to our business, we consider it an ethical obligation to discourage unnecessary barn demolition and encourage the preserve these historic structures.

Situations that fall into the third category cause us a bit more ethical grief because perfectly good barns are often torn down to make way for land development. Unfortunately, the fate of these barns is usually sealed by the time we get involved and whether or not we purchase the wood is unlikely to motivate the developer to change their plans.

In the summer of 2015 I was asked to visit a barn in Voorheesville, NY which was going to be torn down to make room for a country club’s expansion. The local community’s efforts to secure public funding to preserve the structure had met a dead end. At the time I was heading home with my family from a vacation in New Hampshire so I made a quick detour to assess the structure.

Charley taking some measurements with his Fatmax tape measure.
The barn far exceeded my expectations. It was huge; far larger than anything I had ever seen in New York. The structure was entirely built out of circle sawn Eastern White Pine timbers and joists. My two-year-old son and I spent an hour or so taking measurements and snapping photographs.

IMG_6050Our preference was to see the barn preserved, but since this was unlikely to happen we could at least honor the barn’s legacy by giving the wood new life and sharing its story. This is what Pioneer Millworks does best.

We later sent the owner a proposal to purchase the material, which totaled nearly 40,000 board feet – an exceptional amount of material for a single barn, but we never heard back. Our assumption was that someone else had outbid us for the material. Then, recently, purely by chance, I stumbled upon this Facebook page.

Turns out the barn had been saved! A generous donation of land, coupled with an epic community fundraising effort and secured government grants allowed the barn to be relocated to a newly created park located across the street from the barn’s original location.

hilton-barn-exterior

920x920These stories of successful barn preservation efforts are a real inspiration to us as they are often initiated by just a handful of individuals, but end up involving the dedicated efforts of a whole community and more! We at Pioneer Millworks are thrilled that the Hilton barn, whose impressive size left a lasting impression on me, is still standing and now public property. Kudos to all involved!

If you’d like to get involved with barn preservation, here are a few groups we’re fans of:

RESTORE OREGON – HERITAGE BARNS
NEW YORK STATE BARN COALITION
NATIONAL BARN ALLIANCE