Design Week Portland Artist Feature: Work PDX

Henry Silvestrini and Billy

Henry Silvestrini and Billy

Henry Silvestrini has been working at ADX since 2013. His mother was an art teacher and so Henry has been immersed in a creative world from a young age. After studying neuroscience in college he realized that this was not the career path he wanted and refocused on the studio art classes he had started to take at ADX in his free time.

Henry joined ADX’s shop steward program making tables, cabinets, and furniture. Now, in addition to leading the fabrication department, he has begun his own woodworking business, Work PDX. Henry’s project for our Design Week Portland Open House makes use of timbers reclaimed from Centennial Mills.

1. How would you refer to yourself? Woodworker? Artisan? Craftsman?
Fabricator/Designer.

2. How did you get started?
I started building things in college (4 years of studio art/sculpture).

3. Why wood?
Every piece is different and the tools you need to work it are accessible to someone just starting out.

Timber from Centennial Mills

Timber from Centennial Mills

4. What was the first thing you made from wood?
A toy sword as a kid.

5. What does being creative meant to you?
I’m not sure. I guess just having the desire to come up with new ideas or solutions.

6. Do you have any rituals?
None other than my morning coffee.

7. What is your favorite piece?
Michael Heizer’s, “City”. There are not many people who successfully build objects that stand against the scale of nature. He gets close.

My favorite pieces that I’ve made are cast aluminum coyote skulls. Melting and pouring metal by hand is exciting.

Cast aluminum coyote skulls

Cast aluminum coyote skulls


8. Who inspires you?
My biggest influence was my sculpture teacher from college Mike Rathbun. The man could build anything from wood and he did. He also emphasized consideration before building.

9. What do you hope to communicate through your work?
Nothing. I’m happy if people look at it and think, “that’s cool.” I’m interested in ideas of permanence and weight; I like to build big heavy things that will last.

10. If you weren’t doing this what would you be doing?
Working on my house. I bought a teardown and I made the mistake of fixing it up one room at a time.

11. Ultimate piece you want to create
A fire lookout tower out in the middle of nowhere. I love having a view, and living 50’ the air sounds perfect.

12. What’s your favorite thing about PDX?
The people and the food.

13. Favorite song?
Mean, by Taylor Swift. Classic.

14. Favorite bridge?
Steel Bridge.

15. Favorite neighborhood?
South East.

16. What’s your favorite tool?
A table saw

One of the timbers used to make the lamps for Design Week Portland.

One of the timbers used to make the lamps for Design Week Portland.

Henry Silvestrini from Work PDX at read:grain, works with reclaimed wood on Friday, April 28th from 4-7pm during Design Week Portland. For more information, go here.

DESIGN WEEK PORTLAND ARTIST FEATURE: MAKERS WOODWORKS

Garrett Michael of Makers Woodworks

Garrett Michael of Makers Woodworks

Garrett Michael is a craftsman out of Vancouver, Washington that along with partners, Dan McCarl and Justin Appel opened Makers Woodworks in 2013. They specialize in building and installing custom furniture for people or businesses in the Portland metro area. The passion for their work comes through in the pieces they build; “When the client tells you they love the piece, then we’re happy,” says Garrett.

1. How would you refer to yourself? Woodworker? Artisan? Craftsman?
Craftsmen

Garrett Michael, Justin Appel, and Dan McCarl of Makers Woodworks

Garrett Michael, Justin Appel, and Dan McCarl of Makers Woodworks

2. How did you get started?
I was introduced to woodworking in about 6th grade. I loved the ability to create something tangible from rough lumber with machinery and hand tools. There’s also an element of danger and caution you always have to keep in mind.

3. Why wood?
I think I was kind of drawn to it. It’s so random and varied in species; each has its own distinct characteristic, color, pattern, even within that species. Wood is workable, yet super strong, and has a warmth that invites you to feel it. It’s also kind of instant gratification seeing an idea progress through different stages and take shape. You can change direction along the way.

4. What was the first thing you made from wood?
I don’t remember the first thing, probably a mirror or something like that. I do remember making an 8 sided box in a school shop early on.

5. What does being creative meant to you?
Expression. The thought of coming up with something that’s interesting and just a little different than anything you’ve done yet. You can’t help but get inspired by all the awesome stuff being created out there.

Taking some of the black paint off the Kentucky Fence Board

Taking some of the black paint off the Kentucky Fence Board

6. Do you have any rituals?
Coffee in the morning.

7. What is your favorite piece?
That’s a tough question, there are really so many. I’ve really become partial to the mid-century stuff over last few years.

8. Who inspires you?
There are so many awesomely talented people out there, you see fantastic stuff all the time these days with social media. Historically, maybe Tage Frid, Sam Maloof, Greene brothers, even some architecture is inspiring. And I can’t forget my wife.

9. What do you hope to communicate through your work?
That we are into what we are doing and want our clients to love it.

10. If you weren’t doing this what would you be doing?
Don’t know, can’t imagine that at this point. I’ve always wanted to fly though…

11. Ultimate piece you want to create
I would love to build my own home.

12. What’s your favorite thing about PDX?
The rain…haha. The casual vibe, color, music and art scene, biking, and the FOOD.

13. Favorite song?
Too many; I could change daily. I love music.

14. Favorite bridge?
St Johns, though there are still one or two cool old covered bridges around town…I think.

15. Favorite neighborhood?
Hmmm… maybe Laurelhurst. There are so many great areas.

16. What’s your favorite tool?
Whatever I need for the next step.

Preview of the bench Garret is constructing for Design Week Portland

Preview of the bench Garret is constructing for Design Week Portland

Garrett Michael from Makers Woodworks at read:grain, works with reclaimed wood on Friday, April 28th from 4-7pm during Design Week Portland. For more information, go here.

Design Week Portland Artist Feature: Wessinger Woodworks

Bill Wessinger in his woodshop
Bill Wessinger in his woodshop

Bill Wessinger in his woodshop

Bill Wessinger is a sixth-generation native Portlander. He grew up working with his grandfather, Clay, who was always building things in his garage workshop. From the 1st grade until he graduated high school Bill was in the school shop. After college, Bill began building boats and substitute teaching for his former shop teacher. In 2014, he began working for a local nonprofit teaching a mix of boatbuilding, woodworking, and math and introduced him to the community hub of ADX. Since joining the fabrication team at ADX, Bill has worked on his own company Wessinger Woodworks, providing custom made furniture and sculpture.

1. How would you refer to yourself? Woodworker? Artisan? Craftsman?
I think of myself primarily as a woodworker. There are a lot of folks describing themselves as makers these days, but I think of myself more as part of a continuation of the studio furniture movement that has been quietly going on for decades. The newer maker movement I see as being much more focused on integrating electronics and computer modeling into how they make things.

The use of hand tools features prominently in my work, and I think the traditional sense of craftsmanship applies to my work. I’m not sure you can talk in terms of craftsmanship, at least not in the traditional sense, when your pieces are cut out of plywood by a laser cutter or cnc machine. That’s not to say that the things made that way are of a lesser quality in terms of their function or durability, but I think there is something that has been lost when things are made that way.

2. How did you get started?
My grandfather was someone who was always building things, and he would often find ways to involve me and my brothers in his projects. He passed away when I was only about 13, but I think those projects helped me learn to love working with my hands.

Growing up I also went to a K-12 school that even now continues to have a woodworking program. They had me pounding nails into a stump starting in kindergarten or first grade. In high school, shop was an elective that I took all four years. This foundation gave me the skills and the confidence needed to start building boats and to take on a variety of ambitious projects after college.

One of Bill's boats from Wessinger Woodworks website

One of Bill’s boats
from Wessinger Woodworks website

 

3. Why wood?
It is organic and it has a warmth to it. When working with wood we are trying to make things as perfect as possible out of an imperfect material. Wood’s imperfect nature is both a constraint and a challenge; the design is incredibly important and must take things like shrinking, swelling, and grain direction. There is always more to learn, new challenges to be faced, and I enjoy that.

4. What was the first thing you made from wood?
I’m not sure its the first thing I made, but I still have a wooden ladder I made in first grade. It’s only about 5′ tall and pretty narrow but for all the nails in it only just two that are bent over—one where I tried to pound through a knot. There was a good lesson there.

Ladder Bill made in 1st grade

Ladder Bill made in 1st grade

 

5. What does being creative meant to you?
I think that one of the most important ways of being creative is being able to take lessons learned in different places and being able to put them together in new ways.

6. Do you have any rituals?
Not that I can think of.

7. What is your favorite piece?
I have a short bench I made during my junior year of high school. It’s made of just three pieces of wood, cut from the same board—a display at the old OMSI from when it was next to the zoo. It’s very tight, straight grained fir, and the pieces are arranged so the grain is continuous up one leg, across the top and down the other leg. The corners are joined with what is called a twisted dovetail. Its a traditional Japanese joint that is very rarely used and for good reason. Instead of having pins and tails where one piece fits into the other, sliding at a 90-degree angle, this joint has a series of fins which are compound angles, with each one alternating which was it is angled. The two pieces have to slide together at a 45-degree angle. Its hard to describe and probably harder to make, but it turned out quite well. It sits in the corner of my bedroom.

Bench from 11th Grade with Japanese twisted dovetail joints.

Bench from 11th Grade with Japanese twisted dovetail joints.

 

8. Who inspires you?
My love of the outdoors and of the material. I think all my designs are influenced by me feeling that while wood is a renewable resource, it is also often over-harvested, and even where it isn’t necessarily over harvested it will tend to have negative consequences for the environment. That sense inspires me to create designs that will honor the material while building pieces that are light without being delicate.

9. If you weren’t doing this what would you be doing?
If I’d known about it in college I probably would have studied industrial design, and I could see moving in that direction in the future. I love thinking about the place where the design of an object and how we experience those pieces as people meet.

10. The ultimate piece you want to create?
Hans Wegner talked early in his prolific career about designing “just one good chair.” I think he came to recognize that such a chair didn’t really exist, but there is still something there about trying to design and build a chair that looks good, is comfortable, lightweight and durable. Something that instantly feels like a classic. There is something elusive and seductive there.

11. What’s your favorite thing about PDX?
People are interested in applying their creativity towards improving so many things, I like that.

12. Favorite song?
I’ve been turning up Tiderays, by Volcano Choir

13. Favorite bridge?
I enjoy biking across the lower deck of the steel bridge, and I enjoy kayaking under Tilikum Crossing.

14. Favorite neighborhood?
A couple years ago I lived walking distance from that stretch of Stark between about 76th and 82nd with the Academy theater and all the different restaurants and pubs and such. If I could own my ideal home in any neighborhood that might be where I would want to be. Preferably just high enough to see Mt Hood on a clear day.

15. What’s your favorite tool?
Probably the chisel. It requires a lot of attention to the grain of the wood, how the tool feels and how it sounds as you are using it, and they must be kept sharp, but when those things line up the results can be so precise and so rewarding.

Bill holds the prototype for the chair he is making for Design Week Portland.

Bill holds the prototype for the chair he is making for Design Week Portland.

Bill Wessinger from Wessinger Woodworks at read:grain, works with reclaimed wood on Friday, April 28th from 4-7pm during Design Week Portland. For more information, go here.

Design Week Portland Artist Feature: Tiny Shed

Jordan Saia of Tiny Shed
Jordan Saia of Tiny Shed

Jordan Saia of Tiny Shed

Jordan graduated from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn with a degree in fine art with a special affinity for woodworking and welding. He spent some time in Atlanta, creating works out of reclaimed plywood and then bounced back to a NY community of craftsman, further honing his woodworking skills. In 2013 he made the move to Portland, discovering his Tiny Shed workspace at Green Anchors right next to Cathedral Park in North Portland. There, with his workmate Dane of Two Ravens Forge, they practice their crafts to the sounds of the Misfits.

1. How would you refer to yourself? Woodworker? Artisan? Craftsman?
Woodworker, sculptor

2. How did you get started?
Building reclaimed structures with my step-dad

3. Why wood?
It smells good and I love trees

4. What was the first thing you made from wood?
Tiny planter seed box that worked like a jack-in-the-box

5. What does being creative meant to you?
Happiness and freedom

6. Do you have any rituals?
Firing up the wood stove, coffee

7. What is your favorite piece?
Strange burled drops I keep on my desk

Burled wood drops

Burled wood drops


8. Who inspires you?
Isamu Noguchi and Richard Neutra

9. What do you hope to communicate through your work?
Modern functional design with an emphasis on sustainable ethics

10. If you weren’t doing this what would you be doing?
Astronomy

11. The ultimate piece you want to create?
A tree temple

12. What’s your favorite thing about PDX?
The summer

Axe throwing

Axe throwing

13. Favorite song?
Misfits, Hybrid Moments

14. Favorite bridge?
St John’s

15. Favorite neighborhood?
St John’s

16. What’s your favorite tool?
Circular saw

Game table for Design Week Portland

Game table for Design Week Portland

 

Jordan Saia from Tiny Shed at read:grain, works with reclaimed wood on Friday, April 28th from 4-7pm during Design Week Portland. For more information, go here.