The Flame in the Blaze: Portland Fire Court Flooring

We recently salvaged hard maple court flooring from a past life with the Portland Trail Blazers. We’ve added to the collection, incorporating a bit more flame with court flooring sections from the Portland Fire, Portland Oregon’s WNBA team. Attached to plywood, we’re selling all Blazer and Fire tops/pieces in 4’x8′ sheets or cut-to-size.

Luca, our supermodel in Portland, shows off some of the Portland Fire tops.

 

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Where’d it come from? A brief history of cashmerette, auto upholstery, toothpicks, and Heart Pine timbers.

Long Leaf Southern Yellow Pine, aka Heart Pine, is called “the wood America was built with” due to its prevalence in construction during the Industrial Revolution. The Wilton Woolen Mill was no exception, though it was built towards the tail end of this revolution (1840) in Wilton, Maine. We’re excited to usher over 750 Heart Pine post and beam timbers salvaged during the deconstruction to new uses.

Heart Pine timbers and posts supported the factory for generations prior to their reclamation.

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Mood changers: chevrons, herringbones, versailles, and randomness.

Chevrons, herringbones, versailles, basket weaves–patterns. They’re everywhere! We’ve been talking about this trend of patterns and asking: what is it that makes people attracted to them? It turns out there are studies that look at our brain’s reactions and our emotional reactions to patterns. We see patterns even where there are no patterns.

So what is it about patterns that keep us coming back for more? We know they allow us to simplify daily life. Patterns can be calming and comfortable. Or intense and exciting. Here are the top patterns we’re seeing today (and why they’re attractive):

1): Chevrons and herringbones: The repetition and symmetry of these patterns in natural or monochromatic tones evokes the calming and harmonious. The angles inherent in herringbone and chevron give the surface a gentle movement, allowing the eye to travel up and down in a soothing manner.

Chevron pre-panelized reclaimed mixed hardwoods.

Natural wood tones offer more monochromatic consistency.

 

Custom finished to a deep, consistent tone for The Douglas in Vancouver.

 

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THOUGHTFUL SOPHISTICATION—INTERVIEW WITH SUSANNE ANGARANO

We’ve been talking about Thoughtful Sophistication™ a lot in our studios; what it means to us and what we hope it means to others. Of course, there’s our Thoughtful Sophistication collection—but it’s more than just the products and finishes you see. It’s a way to move Beyond the Barn™  to see the other side of reclaimed wood, options that are sleek and modern with a soul. 

However, nothing good comes from just talking in your own bubble, so we reached out to some of our design friends to get their take on what Thoughtful Sophistication means to them, what they see as the next wave in interiors, and how they stay inspired as a creative.

Susanne Angarano, Principal and Interior Designer at Ashley McGraw in Syracuse, NY.

 

I had the fantastic opportunity to chat with Susanne Angarano, Principal + Interior Designer at Ashley McGraw in Syracuse, NY. The architectural design firm creates spaces where people are inspired to work, learn, collaborate, and play—or “design with purpose”, as they say. Susanne’s work is mostly in educational spaces.

D: Thanks for taking the time to talk with me today Susanne, I really appreciate it. Tell me more about your work in sustainable design.

S: Thanks, of course. I started my education in Interior Design and got my masters in Sustainable Design. I landed at Ashley McGraw because it’s a very design AND sustainability focused firm full of people very passionate about both. Our firm is very deeply rooted in sustainable building science and holistic sustainability which is my passion. We have a great balance of the science and the ecological in our sustainable approach and I love how they synthesize together in our designs.

Is holistic sustainability the next step for design?

S: I think so. We take a lot of our direction from International Living Future Institute’s Living Buildings Challenge—what I would call a holistic design approach. It looks at the science behind the energy, water, and site—but also materiality, beauty, social justice, and environmental justice—it’s a great framework to use. I think that even if projects aren’t going towards this certification it’s a great guiding principle for projects so that sustainability can become more than just energy usage or recycling to end-users and clients.

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