Urban Waterfront Living

Welcome to SoWa! The South Waterfront in Portland, OR, locally known as SoWa, continues to blossom with living and retail spaces. The area is modeled after the skyline of Vancouver, BC and is focused on eco-friendly living; nearly all of the buildings are LEED certified. Situated on the river there is easy access to downtown via the street car.

Screen Shot 2017-03-22 at 9.52.41 AMThe Osprey – Block 37, a new 270-unit apartment building along the River Parkway, celebrates the connection between the river front and Portland’s active lifestyle. The design and material use, from Clear Vision glass to  Reclaimed Smooth Teak, work to bring the outside in (and vice versa).

block 37 lobby reclaimed teak paneling pioneer

reclaimed teak paneling block 37 pioneer millworksLocated on corner of SW Gaines Street and SW River Parkway, Block 37 was designed to be contextual to its surroundings. The street level features the first waterfront retail space in SoWa, as well as a dog washing area, storage for kayaks/paddle boards, bikes and other gear. This storage area has a storefront presence which connects tenants with the urban riverfront walkway. Area visitors get a glimpse inside where Block 37 resident outdoor enthusiasts clean gear after a day on the water, a trip camping & hiking, or a long day in the (bike) saddle.

SoWa OR riverfront

SoWa (The Osprey – Block 37 is the white building on the lower right side of this photo.)


GBD Architects
 describes the Block 37 design as a modified U-shape building which either projects or steps back to emphasize corners, breaks up the massing (adding a pedestrian scale); and provides shadow lines, texture and visual interest. The layout allowed for a second-level terrace and a common “living room” which joins a second-level deck fronting the river and greenway, further connecting residents to their surroundings.

“Our design approach, what we term ‘thoughtful living’ has been to think in decades rather than years, consistent with the overall vision for the Waterfront District,” said Paul Keller, founding principal and CEO of Mack Urban, the property developer.

pioneer millworks teak paneling block 37 lobby entry

Reclaimed Teak paneling welcomes tenants and visitors at the main lobby entry of Block 37. A street level seating area thoughtfully invites folks to sit and chat.

 

Inside, materials are posh with an expansive lounge, upscale kitchen salon, and a mail room with seating area and sofas. Reclaimed Smooth Teak* paneling accents the common areas, leasing office, and lounge/game room. On each level, the living unit’s entries are surrounded by the authentic 18th and 19th century planks that pay homage to the nearby river/water, having been used traditionally for boats and decks.

reclaimed teak paneling by pioneer millworks in block 37 portland or

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Block 37_Osprey_TeakSmooth Pioneer Millworks w pure_Portland OR

Altogether 4,900 sq ft of Reclaimed Smooth Teak with a natural oil/wax finish adorns various walls within Block 37. With incredible stability and an extremely durable surface from years of weathering and use, Pioneer Millworks traditional Smooth Teak is precision milled and sanded, showing the natural beauty of the wood grain. Offering an organic touch, it serves as a point of connection between indoor living spaces and engagement with the outdoors.

Block 37_Osprey_TeakSmooth w monocoat pure_Portland OR_MG_9505smFSC-certified as 100% recycled, the teak planks further Block 37’s efforts to attain LEED Gold Certification. Other sustainable design strategies include: high-performance envelope, rainwater treatment, native landscaping, light-color roof with filtration rock garden, access to public transportation, and high-efficiency M/E/P systems.

* Our Reclaimed Teak is sustainably salvaged from Indonesia. 1% of all of our Reclaimed Teak sales are donated to conservation causes in Indonesia and Malaysia. Currently we’re supporting the Borneo Project in their fight to end the loss of habitat for the indigenous peoples of Indonesia.

 

Raw and Honest: Revitalizing “Old Town” Portland and Shifting Spaces in Seattle

“Old town” Portland is an area with a lot of history, some of it grand, some of it not so savory. We’re excited to see this area on the up and up. One of the most recent tenants? Our friends at Ankrom Moisan Architects (AMA).

ama-new-portland-officeAMA specializes in urban architecture and recently moved their Portland offices to the new 38 Davis Building at the corner of Northwest Davis Street and Northwest Naito Parkway. The firm’s 227 Portland employees now find their work spaces on three floors and 58,000-square feet of the six-story building. The AMA team is aiming for LEED Silver certification at this new location. Within the space is a variety of storied wood bringing different history to the “Old town”.

reclaimed-softwoods-in-ama-office-by-pioneerIn the words of AMA, “Through a deliberate combination of raw, honest, and playful elements, our new workplace will better express our thought processes as we work to continually elevate design.” Exposed beams and columns, heavy steel, contemporary furniture and muted colors are joined by reclaimed hardwoods and softwoods throughout the office. The new spaces use these raw and honest elements to celebrate structure and design.

reclaimed-softwoods-ceiling-ama-portland-by-pioneerThe main conference room immediately piqued our interest with its partially painted table top. (Perhaps our conference table is in need of a new inspired finish…) The AMA conference room incorporates lighter, reflective tones on each surface. American Prairie Painted fit the plan offering brighter surfaces allowing light reflection while highlighting original surfaces acquired from their past life cladding agricultural structures.

Subtle yet powerful punches of color appear throughout AMA in Portland. In meeting areas reminiscent of booth seating Black & Tan 50/50 paneling is accented with opaque orange and blue planks. We’re loving these meeting pods; offering privacy in a more compact footprint is something we could definitely get into for our showroom/office spaces!

ama-reclaimed-oak-booth-meeting-space

Sourced from fences in the southern states, we partially plane each plank. Because no two planks are alike and each has natural variation in thickness, individual boards have a different level of surfacing, resulting in truly random areas of untouched black paint.

reclaimed-black-and-tan-5050-oak-seating-ama-office-portlandThe lobby area desk is wrapped with Grandma’s Attic Reclaimed Softwoods and has that punch of color with bright yellow wall art.

ama-portland-reclaimed-wood-desk-wrap-from-pioneerThe unrestrained design experience will be shared with co-workers and clients alike in a central meeting room. AMA notes the creative process “takes each participant through an array of knowledge, references, emotions, and memories.” Here they’ve incorporated Black & Tan 50/50 at an angle to create a mosaic of wall paneling which spills from the wall onto the ceiling.

black-and-tan-5050-reclaimed-oak-portland-architect-meeting-room-webportland-architect-office-reclaimed-oak-paneling-from-pioneer

black-and-tan-5050-reclaimed-oak-ceiling-vent

AMA crafted a vent by carving into Black & Tan planks. (This reminds us a bit of our ‘raked’ reclaimed wood – more on that in another post.)

A bit further up the coast, the AMA office in Seattle, WA grew quickly from a team of 3 to a group of 100 scattered throughout two buildings and multiple floors. In order to support their culture of collaboration and innovation, in early 2016 the teams relocated to Seattle’s downtown core. Preserving the authenticity of their space, structural elements were left raw and exposed. Reclaimed American Gothic Engineered Ash brings warm tones while remaining understated in the Seattle office.

seattle-architect-ag-ash_floorFocused on community, AMA designed the Seattle studio “to be welcoming to clients, visitors, consultants, and the wider design community as well. The core of the suite serves the public, and includes multiple conference rooms, a great room/lounge, materials library, print room, and model shop.”  An open stairway connects the two floors and allows a seamless flow of  Reclaimed Ash between levels.

seattle-architect-ag-ash_stairsReclaimed Ash moves up from the floor to a long meeting table within the Seattle AMA office.Reclaimed Ash moves up from the floor to a long meeting table within the Seattle AMA office.

 

The Barrow House: A ‘sleek farmhouse’ restaurant and parlor.

Sleek farmhouse. Not commonly paired together, but that is the result of The Barrow House restaurant and parlor in Clifton, New Jersey. Assorted rooms are strung together with eclectic decor sure to feed the hipster in all of us.

reclaimed-mushroom-board-ceiling-and-settlers-plank-floor-pioneerWhen we first started talking with Dean and Thomas about their vision for their restaurant, we were excited to learn how much they appreciated the history of the barn/restaurant space they were re-working. It was first started as a steakhouse building that housed other restaurants over the years with countless additions and alterations made for each one along the way.

settlers-plank-flooring-by-pioneer-millworksDean and Thomas wanted to maintain the rambling concept and celebrate the imperfections that might come along with such a storied past including roughly textured wood, chipping plaster, varied colors, original artifacts, and different flooring throughout the space. Parlor, bar, farm food – what could be better? Now that they’re open, let’s peek inside some of its remarkable spaces.

reclaimed-foundry-maple-and-barn-front-pioneer-millworks

Cocktails on tap, a solid selection of beer, and cider…it was hard to move past the bar. But we’d be doing a disservice to this blog if we didn’t mention the wood: Decades of water over pouring over the surface of our River Skins (cladding the bar front) give it a driftwood texture, raising the knots and grain reminding us of drift wood.

 

Overall Pioneer Millworks provided 12 different reclaimed wood materials which were used throughout the restaurant on a variety of surfaces. In the bar area you’re greeted with a variety of libations including cocktails on tap and cider. The space has Foundry Maple flooring while the ceiling is clad with an original-whitewashed V-groove siding. When the Dean mentioned wanting the bar front to look like an old boat haul, we immediately suggested River Skins. These skins were cut from the outsides of Douglas Fir timbers that were once used for rafts to float hardwood logs downstream to sawmills in southern Canada. What we love most are the details that pepper the space like vintage hooks added to the bar front, a convenient place to hang your hat (or purses, of course).

inside-out-barrow-house-reclaimed-wood-pioneerAcross from the bar, the outside is…inside – a whimsical result of the building’s add-on history. There’s something to discover in each pocket that makes up The Barrow House, which is part of the fun.

telephone-box-barrow-house

Our Settlers’ Plank grade celebrates original saw marks, nail holes, ferrous staining, and other signs of its previous life.Much of the dining area has Settlers’ Plank Oak flooring in random wide widths, a favorite choice for a restaurant. The inevitable wear and tear blends easily into the original character (think: saw marks, nail holes, insect trails, ferrous staining) common to this grade.

taxidermy-barrow-house-corner-cabient

Another gem. An old-school built-in corner cabinet updated with lighting and three dimensional ‘art work’.

 

Throughout the restaurant are different grades of American Prairie (our version for that popular barn siding look). Boards salvaged from agricultural wood that were once heavily painted but have been worn and chipped away at by time. The Barrow House highlights paneling with paint ranging from nearly opaque to light remnants in yellow, red, and white. Weathered brown boards, having developed their deep chocolate color through a century of high temperatures inside agricultural structures, adorn vertical surfaces in several different spaces within the restaurant. All those chocolatey tones wet the appetite for dessert.

reclaimed-mushroom-board-ceiling-and-settlers-plank-floor-pioneerWandering a bit further, you’ll discovered the wine room. Stone walls frame the back-lit wine cabinets (which hold a very nice list of vino) surrounding a large farm-syle table. Overhead Mushroom Boards clad the ceiling, offering higher texture and deep color that plays off of Settler’s Plank Oak floor.

 

 

wine-behind-glass-the-barrow-houseWhen you’re outside, you arrive at a classic wrap-around porch and American Prairie Brown Board on the exterior of the winding spaces. The barn shows off American Prairie Painted, salvaged a number of years ago from the classic red barns common throughout the northeast. The barn and wrap-around porch are actually Douglas Fir timber frames designed and erected by our sister company, New Energy Works Timberframers.

Our desire to keep the American tradition and history of agricultural barns alive and well has lead us on a journey of discovering additional sources of softwoods that offer the same character we love in barn wood, but are from more sustainable sources. We’ve found planks from fences, livestock pens, and other less historical exterior facades to supplement our barn wood collection. the-barrow-house-nj-reclaimed-barn-siding-pioneer-2new-energy-works-timber-frame-at-the-barrow-houseInside the timber frame you’ll see more American Prairie and a one-of-a-kind thresher floor milled from stock reclaimed from barn structures as well. We were happy to see this floor, it isn’t one you’ll see on our website, but it is a good example of project collaboration. We love when conversations lead to use of an uncommon material where its character can be celebrated. Our favorite part though, is the roof of the barn timber frame. It retracts half-way, letting diners literally sit under the stars!

the-barrow-house-parlor-njWe really enjoyed working with Dean and Thomas to find the perfect materials for all the various needs of their project. We can’t say enough about the unique experience they’ve created with The Barrow House or the fun Jered and Jennifer recently had exploring. Our suggestion is that when you visit you plan to time to wander.

Unique, rare, atypical – hey, that’s what makes our jobs fun and your projects outstanding. Thanks Dean and Thomas!

Reclaimed Paneling Equals Environmental Health

Just in time for the holidays we tallied the impact of incorporating 2,200 sq ft of reclaimed paneling to a corporate project. The quick results: over 8 tons of waste was prevented from entering a landfill and 30 trees were saved. What benefits do 30 trees offer? We’ll get to that a little further down the page.

Reclaimed Hardwoods Paneling by Pioneer Millworks

Using 2,200 sq ft of reclaimed oak = 30 trees saved and 8 tons of waste kept out of landfills.

Think siding (vertical or horizontal). Think paneling…half way or up to the ceiling or on the ceiling. For a recent west coast project we crafted paneling from Settlers’ Plank reclaimed Oak. We’ve done some calculations to see just what using 2,200 square feet of reclaimed material meant to us and the environment.

settlers plank reclaimed paneling

Settlers’ Plank reclaimed paneling was fitted to a timber frame home game room.

With our average material yield we would have started with about 4,000 BF of reclaimed oak boards and joists to produce 2,200 SF of finished material. (We defect for metal artifacts, rot, old joinery, and lengths under 18″. These pieces are recycled, going to our chipper to become wood pellets or to our clean-burning kiln which heats our building.)  By using 4,000 BF of reclaimed oak instead of fresh sawn oak the following environmental benefits were realized:

–  We prevented 8 tons of waste from entering a landfill which would have occupied 12.35 cubic yards of landfill space
–  Once wood waste is sent to landfills, the exposure to other types of waste may prohibit wood from breaking down. Instead, it may partially decompose and release methane gas – a type of greenhouse gas.
–  We saved approximately 30 trees (based on the Doyle scale) from being cut down
–  The 30 trees saved by recycling 4000 BF of wood can absorb as much as 945 pounds of carbon dioxide out of the air each year.
–  30 trees can provide a day’s supply of oxygen for up to 120 people.
–  The net cooling effect of  30 young, healthy trees is equivalent to 300 room-size air conditioners operating 20 hours a day
–  30 large trees can lift up to 3,000 gallons of water out of the ground and discharge it into the air in a day.

trees and horses

Trees! We’re big fans of trees. Not only are they good for us, but for our animals, and the entire planet.

More on our paneling: We craft it to order in our shops in Farmington, NY and McMinnville, OR; it is FSC-Certified reclaimed wood; the panels make installation of wood walls, ceilings, and partitions quick and easy. The options are nearly endless with more than forty species, grades and textures available. The wood is valued for its grain pattern, durability, deep patina, and incredible character. And more often than not the antique wood used in paneling will show signs of its previous life with ferrous staining from nails or bolts, insect trails, and old joinery notches.

As always, thank you for helping us help the environment. Best wishes and holiday cheer to you and yours!