Reclaimed Wood at the Worlds’ First Pizza Museum

Brian Dwyer and the other founders of Pizza Brain. From left: Ryan Anderson, Joseph Hunter, Brian Dwyer and Michael Carter. (Photo by Brian Dwyer)

 

Brian Dwyer has earned himself a spot in the Guinness Book of World Records as a purveyor of the largest collection of pizza memorabilia. Incorporating our reclaimed wood into his one-of-a-kind project also earned him a spot here, on our blog.

 

 

Brian and his partners recently opened the world’s first pizza museum and pizzeria in the Fishtown section of Philadelphia called Pizza Brain. I got the chance to work with them on their totally unique project.

 

I met the Pizza Brain team early on in the construction process and it was clear to me they wanted to incorporate as much reclaimed material as they could back into the museum/restaurant.

Our Settlers Plank reclaimed mixed hardwood flooring joined a tin ceiling which had been reclaimed from a nearby church, and the team even used discarded pianos to build the pizza bar! There is truly a long list of reclaimed products throughout the space – and that’s not even counting the pizza museum memorabilia pieces.

I stopped by the other day (captured a few images) and had lunch with one of the owners. Great food!!

 

Display cases built into the floor house pizza memorabilia which are frequently rearranged and refreshed. (The display case in the floor near me housed pizza related dolls!)

 

As I sat eating a piece of pizza, I noticed my eyes were drawn to the floor.  And it wasn’t just because of the rich browns, golds, tans, reds – the original wear marks, knots, saw marks, nail holes – but I was enamored with the display cases which are recessed into the floor. There are several displays scattered in the Settlers Plank mixed hardwoods. Each hold various pieces of pizza history and commercialization. They add to the uniqueness of this place.

 

Settlers’ Plank reclaimed mixed hardwoods offered just the right texture, durability, history, and visual interest the Pizza Brain team was looking for.

 

Brian Dwyer plans on constantly rotating the museum collection within the space, so each visit will be different from the last.  The next time I’m in for a slice, I can’t wait to glance at the floor and see what’s on display.

Pizza Brain is connected to Little Baby’s Ice Cream that also incorporated the Settlers Plank mixed hardwoods reclaimed flooring throughout their parlor. They offer plenty of unusual ice cream flavors including, of course, “pizza”.   On my next visit, I plan on sampling the Maryland barbecue flavor which combines Old Bay mixed with barbecue sauce.  Sounds delicious!

 

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Mile-High Reclaimed Wood in Denver

I had never been to Denver, except for a prolonged visit to the airport several years ago.  So last month, I flew out to meet some people and see some of Pioneer Millworks‘ finished work. Even though many commercial and retail projects are consistent from one location to the next, it is always gratifying to see how our reclaimed wood is integrated with other aspects of design.

My first stop was a small womens clothing store that opened a couple of years back – No doubt, the floor has gotten better with age.  Even the staff at the store knows it!

Old paint, scratches, dents & dings, and absolutely beautiful.

Salvaged from a factory in Michigan, the occasional stripes of paint help to make the floor come to life, along with the scratches and dents imparted by decades of use. Sometimes the floors aren’t the only things with stories to tell. A woman that works at the store explained that just days before my visit, a newlywed couple had come in twice – first on their own, and second with their interior designer – to look at the flooring and use it in their new home. We love it when a design makes that kind of an impression.

Just down the corridor is another gem, where the floor was crafted from Yellow Pine planks recycled from a grain mill in Arkansas. A trend in both residential and commercial design is to celebrate the beauty of imperfection, which this floor does exceptionally.

Surprisingly smooth from years of use

The undulating surface, tonal differences from one plank to the next, and even some subtle texture caused by years of grain rushing past, makes for a perfect backdrop for the clothing. Some of the fixtures in the store make use of our reclaimed Douglas Fir as well.

Though I didn’t need any makeup, I dropped by this cosmetics store, which uses our barn siding on the exterior of many of their new locations. The dark and rich tones in the barnwood are selected such that when installed, the brightly lit interior of the store stands out. At the same time, the siding creates a highly textured facade that keeps the continuity of natural materials and products.

Variegated colors, textures, and signs of previous – quite a contrast to the surroundings!

Lastly, I noticed some familiar looking shutters made with our Attic Collection reclaimed softwoods. These are a great example of our capabilities beyond floors and walls, having been fabricated in our own shop. Even though these are heavily whitewashed, the randomized texture from the original and planed surfaces is a crucial part of the overall design. This variation breaks up the color of the shutters to help them stand out from the background wall color.

Shutters? Yep – we make those too!

Denver, and the entire Rocky Mountain region, is well served by either of our two locations. This helps to keep shipping costs down, with a faster lead time on a broader selection of products. If you have a chance to stop by the local shopping malls in the Mile High City, feel free to check out these stores for yourself. I’m hopeful that not long from now, we’ll have more projects to share.

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All About Ash

Reclaimed Ash, American Gothic Sample Board

Today, I’m all about Reclaimed Ash!

 

 

We’ve got a lot of beautiful things around here. Everyday I’m surrounded by unique, gorgeous wood in a myriad of different forms with exciting, new-to-us reclaimed projects coming in every week.

 

 

 

 

 

settlers plank oak flooring

Settlers’ Plank Reclaimed Oak is a great example of  one of our most popular core products, reclaimed mostly from barns.

 

Our core product line, those items that we make time and again, consists of some of the most exceptional and storied wood species and grades you can find (reclaimed or otherwise).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Living Center Chapel Reclaimed Ash and Oak

 

While it’s hard to pick a favorite, I find that once in a while I’m struck by something.  Sometimes it’s an exclusive, limited edition item that is source specific. Sometimes it’s a new finishing technique on an old favorite. Sometimes, like today, I find myself drawn to a particular species from our core product line. I’m fascinated with its inherent beauty and also its surprising flexibility: American Gothic Reclaimed Ash.

 

eco-friendly engineered reclaimed ash
Our Reclaimed Ash has been knocking my socks off. It’s cool and modern. It’s rich and warm. It’s black and white and even blue. Ash is one of those species that can be anything you need it to be, without sacrificing its own character.

The grain pattern is somewhat pronounced and the natural tones are neutral, with a slight iridescence that makes for a stunning floor, wall, or countertop with just a coating of polyurethane or tung oil. (We sometimes say the grain pattern appears “flame-like”.)

 

 

 

reclaimed ash stains pioneer

Apply any sort of stain or color, Ash’s light, neutral color tone makes it the perfect base for a dramatic finish.

 

 

 

 

 

You can add a pigment or color, something natural or something wild, and it just shines. The grain doesn’t get lost, rather the light neutral color tone makes it the perfect base for a dramatic finish.

 

Simple and natural, or bold and colorful, I find it to be a spectacular choice for just about any project or application.

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Reclaimed in Style at Doc Magrogan’s

Kevin Vickery, our Mid-Atlantic Representative, shares a recent restaurant project from PA:

University of Pennsylvania students are excited now that Doc Magrogan’s Oyster Bar has opened in the heart of the campus. I recently had the opportunity to work with the owner of Doc’s and his team on incorporating reclaimed wood into their restaurant.

The theme for the space, as described by the owner, was “a combination of an old tavern mixed with very clean and crisp beach cottage, while maintaining a trendy feel to this upscale location”.

Our reclaimed grey barn siding was a great solution to the main bar walls. The century old barn wood provided the grey tones and lighter colors in varying widths, which instantly brings the customer impressions of a waterside cottage.

In the dining room, Doc’s team had us build railing panels from our reclaimed Indonesian Hardwoods, Trade Winds.A perfect fit for an oyster restaurant since this wood is salvaged from the shipping industry. The exterior of the wood shows all the signs of the rough sea life it endured as it crossed the Pacific Ocean: metal strapping marks, scuffs, dings, and occasional nail holes.

But Doc’s didn’t stop there.After the team at Doc’s realized what beautiful wood lies directly below the surface of the weathered exterior of the shipping hardwoods, they decided to have us construct table tops. We planed down the Trade Winds hardwood shipping stock to reveal brighter, cleaner versions of the various species with colors ranging from deep red-browns, blondes and tans, to light oranges and soft reds.

In addition to the reclaimed wood, Doc’s added many accessories such as a canoe hanging from the ceiling, old nautical pictures, and antique oars to truly accomplish the theme. My opinion: Mission Accomplished!

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