Designing to Cool the Climate

BEYOND ZERO: ARCHITECTURE is just starting to take on its role as climate healer by transforming buildings from massive carbon emitters into effective carbon sponges.

Bruce King (The New Carbon Architecture) and David Arkin (Arkin Tilt Architects) talk with Jonathan Orpin (New Energy Works and Pioneer Millworks) about the building technologies that exist to fight climate change and how we might create “buildings made from the sky”.

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5 Tips and Tricks for Installing Exterior Siding

Installing wood siding offers quick reward, covering a large plane of a project with texture, color, and protection from the elements in a short amount of time. We’ve gathered 5 of our favorite tips and tricks from folks with experience to share with you:

Pioneer Millworks American Prairie barn siding, vertically installed on a New England garage.

1: The Rain Screen:
Great for vertical or horizontal siding applications. “A ventilated rain screen prevents direct contact of the wood siding with the weathertight vapor barrier (aka: house wrap). Direct contact between wood and this barrier inevitably leads to rot and product failure.” –New Energy Works design build company.

Best: furring strips, narrow lengths of wood set approximately 12” apart, secured (with screws) to the exterior’s underlying wood fiber ‘outsulation’, plywood or other substrate.

The layers of a recommended siding installation.
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History of Shou Sugi Ban (yakisugi)

Charred exterior cladding continues to protect buildings in a Japanese village. Photo by https://thegate12.com/article/157 

Shou sugi ban charred wood originated in Japan. A cursory Google search will show varying claims for the date of origin, but the focus is usually on shou sugi ban’s extraordinary longevity. One hurdle to research is language. English-speakers know this charred wood as shou sugi ban, but in Japan it’s called yakisugi, yakisugi-ita, or yakiita.

Charring wood is not a new concept. Humans started modifying wood with fire around 400,000 years ago. In addition to basic fire-hardening, modern humans routinely burned boat and fence post bottoms to prevent rot and increase longevity. Fire was traditionally used to bend lumber in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and Japan for boat building. (Photos from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/ File:Clacton_Spear_2018.JPG and http://blog.douglasbrooksboatbuilding.com/2016/04/bending-bottom-yakimage.html)

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Rake it in! Modern texture on reclaimed and sustainable paneling

Welcome to Raked™! We’re swapping blades and milling dimensional character to the top of a variety of reclaimed and sustainable wood species. This high relief texture yields a crisp, modern pattern well suited for interior walls, ceilings, and wraps.
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